Doing Good Works: Praying, Fasting, Charitable Giving

Some devoted Christians around the world will be observing Holy Week starting this coming Saturday till Sunday, 9-15th of April 2017. For many this can be set aside as a holy time for praying, fasting, giving alms and doing charitable deeds to help the underprivileged. What a special time!


An angel in Acts, announced to the devoted Cornelius that his prayers of thanksgiving and almsgiving were remembered by God. He is about to come to know Christ.  Acts 10:3-4 says,

3 “About the ninth hour of the day he saw clearly in a vision an angel of God coming in and saying to him, “Cornelius.” 4 And he stared at him in terror, and said, “What is it, Lord?” And he said to him, “Your prayers and your alms have ascended as a memorial before God…” (RSV)

Here’s a seemingly simplistic but a spiritual question:
If God recognizes and remembers our prayers and charitable giving, then shouldn’t we be encouraged to pray more and give more? 

Our obvious answer would naturally be “Yes!” but our good works of praying and almsgiving can either be both a good work or they can be done purely out of genuine faith.  Martin Luther cautioned that none of our good works can earn any merit toward our salvation, or earn God’s recognition to merit more approval.  According to Paul, our human righteousness is worthless as rags.  Salvation and good works ought to be done only in faith.

Now here’s a bit of theology to get your head around… If you are past the “human religion” stage and couldn’t care less about trying to earn salvation or earn God’s favor by being a good person, then that’s great!  You are set free to act in good faith to move on to do even more good works.  Since you’ve already been created into God’s beloved child, then you are set free from a human striving in order to please God (see Luther’s quote below).

Be encouraged to observe Holy Week with passion. Pray more, fast more, and be more charitable. Praise the Lord! Do your good works boldly. God loves it and hears it. 

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Martin Luther states in his A Treastise on Good Works (1520):

XVI. But you say: How can I trust surely that all my works are pleasing to God, when at times I fall, and talk, eat, drink and sleep too much, or otherwise transgress, as I cannot help doing? Answer: This question shows that you still regard faith as a work among other works, and do not set it above all works. For it is the highest work for this very reason, because it remains and blots out these daily sins by not doubting that God is so kind to you as to wink at such daily transgression and weakness. Aye, even if a deadly sin should occur (which, however, never or rarely happens to those who live in faith and trust toward God), yet faith rises again and does not doubt that its sin is already gone;…

Asking for whatever you wish

John 15:7 says: “If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.

Someone less familiar with the bible who reads this might easily take this to mean that God will grant whatever wish he or she wishes.  I have heard of Christians who innocently asks the Lord for a miracle or healing and receive from the Lord the answer they prayed for. Is this coincidence or for real.  Probably a bit of both.

As a devil’s advocate, I wish to ask: Do we treat God the Father like an earthly father who gives good gifts, or as a genie in a bottle?  The bible directs us to approach God like we would approach a good earthly father.  For some of us Christians, we might hesitate to do so because it would be wrong to treat God our Father like a genie in a bottle who grants whatever wish we desire, but for many of us Christians, it is also practical and simple approach to understanding God. But for many Christians who do ask but do not receive, I have empathy for them.

As a father myself, my daughter will ask me for this and that, and anything she sees and likes. But as a father who loves my dear daughter, I know that some things would be unhealthy or bad for her.  I also don’t want to spoil her.

Our Father God also knows what is good and what is bad for his spiritual children. Wouldn’t God also keep things away from us in order to protect us just like a good earthly father would want to protect his children?  I certainly believe He would.  We have a Heavenly Father who knows exactly what would be good or bad or unhealthy for us.  We would not know it at the time but God knows the future and foresees what would be bad or un- or counter-productive for our lives.

Do you trust our Heavenly Father even if He were to withhold some seemingly good things back from you?

God’s kingdom: Small churches or mega-churches?

In Jesus’ days, the religious leaders were consumed with anxiety that Jesus had been gaining too many followers (John 11:45-57).

 11:48 – “If we let him go on like this, everyone will believe in him, and then the Romans will come and take away both our temple and our nation.”
12:19 – “’See, this is getting us nowhere.  Look how the the whole world has gone after him!‘”

Religion today is still concerned about how many people attend our worship services.  The number of parishioners translate into dollar amounts collected in the offering plate, which is translated into how many pastors it hires/calls and how big a building project can be.  This causes us think of adherents and followers as just a piece of the pie (“more for others means less for us”). This also causes us to think of the small church as lowly vs mega-churches as more successful.  Should we carry this view of God’s kingdom.  Is this a healthy or distorted way to view God’s kingdom?

Jesus was concerned about discipling people and truth and life, not the number of followers he has.  For pastors, elders and deacons, it takes faith to carry on as small churches in communities where there are mega-churches next door.

Truth of the gospel brings freedom

As Christians, we love our social freedoms–freedom of religion, of assembly, of the press, to name a few.  Freedom is a natural outcome of the Christian gospel. Back on February 1st, it was National Freedom Day in the USA, but many do not understand where these liberties in our free world came from.

I’m considered an early generation of millennials and attended several liberal arts universities. We, as others in the western world, have been subjected to an indoctrination and propaganda of untruths and lies in our education systems.  This flowed into how the mainstream mainstream media viewed the world.  The end result was a generation of socialists. I’m a fruit of this but thank God it was the Church that brought me back into a Christian worldview. As Christians, we have lost ground.  Socialism and other religious thought dominate this generation’s philosophical outlook on the world. This can only be countered when we teach the good news; otherwise, we might be in danger of losing our God-given freedoms.

In a democratic society, the conservatives and liberals ought to mutually respect the people’s decision of their elected national leader. In Jan. 2017, media attacks on President Trump incited riots and vandalism.  I was very much saddened to see how the left-wing media had created a division in America. Thank God Trump did not just “suck it up.” I think the left needs to own up to their divisiveness.

We need a correction in mainstream media and how universities teach our young people. This day will come one day, as the truth sets people free.  As Christians, God calls us to set the prisoners free and be salt and light in a dark world. Jesus said: “If you hold to my teaching, you are really my disciples. Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” (John 8:31-32).  He was speaking in terms of salvation but the point here is that there is an inherent sense of freedom experienced when we share the truth of the good news of Christ.  Truth must be spoken by all as private citizens, as well as, by the media/press in the public sphere. We have a responsibility to convey the truth in whether it’s in the church, government, the courts, the media, in schools, in all places at all times.

givemefreedomFrom within God’s kingdom, God will be calling law-abiding, Christ-loving people who are truth-tellers to lead society in our classrooms, the courtrooms, and legislatures.  The church and the truth we hold dear in the Gospel of Jesus Christ need to intersect with society so that people can come out from under a veil of darkness.  The truth can and will set people free.

Mark 5:19 – Be a witness first to our family, friends, or people?

A continuation of a further look at Mark 5:19 on the man who was exercised of a legion of demons and had them cast into a heard of pigs (swine). Did Jesus tell the healed man to return and give witness of Jesus Christ to his family, friends, or to his own people?

Mark 5:19 says: “But Jesus would not let him. Instead, he told him, “Go back home to your family and tell them how much the Lord has done for you and how kind he has been to you.” (Good News)

NLT, Amplified, Douay-Rheims:  uses “family
NIV, ESV/RSV/NRSV, N/KJV: uses “friends
CEB, CSB, NJB, NET: uses “your [own] people

Which is correct? One biblical commentary states: “Jesus refused the man permission to accompany him, but instructed him to return to the circle of family [Mark’s phrase τοὺς σούς may well include a circle wider than the man’s family, but there can be no doubt that the family was at the center of that circle.”  (William L. Lane, NICNT).

Another states: “To your people” (πρὸς τοὺς σούς), unique to the NT, has been taken narrowly by some to mean “your family” … But most take this to refer more broadly to “the people of your area” (R.A. Guelich, Word/ WBC).

In terms of biblical theology, either interpretation would not have any implications; but it would in terms of evangelism.  Do we go and bring our witness of Christ to our family first, or friends first, or our own ethnic people?  Obviously, we should evangelize everyone, but if I were this man healed of demon possession, I would want to tell my family first, then everyone else.

Broken relationships and demon possession

In Mark ch. 5, Jesus cast out a legion of demons and allowed them to enter violently into a heard of pigs.  After he was freed from demons, Jesus told him:

Go back home to your family and tell them how much the Lord has done for you and how kind he has been to you (Mk. 5:19, GNT).

Some believe this man formerly had a broken relationship with his family, people, or friends and his bitterness, anger and brokenness became a key to an open doorway that led to demonic possession.  Can broken relationships cause a spiritual disorder in people?  Not necessarily, but I believe it potentially can.  When people experience deep distress and trauma due to broken relationships, bitterness, anger, depression, etc., can take over their lives. If they do not deal with their brokenness, it can become a doorway for the evil one to enter in, resulting in demonic depression, oppression or even eventually possession. We don’t talk much about demonic possession much in church today. As Christians, we desire God’s will for unity in the Church, in our communities, in our families, and in our relationships.  The devil aims to cause disruption, dissensions, disunity, and will go as far to cause hate, if possible.  We pray against this spiritual darkness pray for the peace of Christ to bring harmony and love.
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I recently watched this on YouTube: A Roman Catholic priest and an experienced and knowledgable exorcist, Fr. Vince Lampert, said the man in Mark 5:19 resulted because he had a broken family relationship that enabled the devil into his life.  It’s a very interesting and educational presentation on casting out demons. Stuff we rarely hear about in the Church today.

First Lady prays the Lord’s Prayer at Trump Rally

It was great to see First Lady, Melania Trump, pray the Lord’s Prayer at this Saturday’s huge rally in Melbourne, Florida. Good to see. Jesus said we ought to be salt and light and not let the light be hidden under a bushel basket.  May the light of Christ, and his good news, shine brightly and overcome darkness. [forward to 37min]

Surpassing a high standard of righteousness

There seems to be a difference when we say we are to “be righteous” or to “live righteously”.  To live righteously would seem to imply that our actions we do are to be righteous.  To be righteous would imply a constant state of righteousness.  Which is easier to carry out?

In Matthew 5:20, Jesus gave his disciples a command that is impossible to carry out:

For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.”

I would say it would be impossible to surpass the righteousness of law-abiding Pharisees even if in today’s modern-day context.  Unless Jesus becomes our very own righteousness, or gives us his righteousness, there is no way to have a perfect righteousness.   Living out perfect moral lives is impossible and Jesus seemed to be giving us the impression here to the effect of saying, “Since you can’t surpass the righteous of typical lawyers, there is no way you can do it on your own, you are then forced to run toward Jesus to be our righteousness.

Can we live righteous enough lives to have a righteousness that is better than perfect law-abiding people?  I have admit that I don’t.

My prayer: Jesus, be my righteousness because I cannot be righteous enough to surpass the righteousness of good people.