Restoring a broken world: via God’s strength in human weakness

In 1 Corinthians 4:9-13, St. Paul the Apostle shared with the Christians and the Church in Rome about how he was mistreated and suffered persecution. He was comparing his suffering with the Christians who gloried in their power and strength. It’s a very stark comparison.

For it seems to me that God has put us apostles on display at the end of the procession, like those condemned to die in the arena. We have been made a spectacle to the whole universe, to angels as well as to human beings.
We are fools for Christ, but you are so wise in Christ!
We are weak, but you are strong!
You are honored, we are dishonored!
To this very hour we go hungry and thirsty, we are in rags, we are brutally treated, we are homeless. We work hard with our own hands.
When we are cursed, we bless;
when we are persecuted, we endure it;
when we are slandered, we answer kindly.
We have become the scum of the earth, the garbage of the world—right up to this moment.

What ought to be the norm in Christianity? Is it suffering or is it strength?  In Paul’s days, it was suffering and persecution. Today in the west, the norm is to choose vain human glory and power as if it were a human right. Today, in places like the Middle East, Christians are suffering greater persecution at the hands of radical Muslim terrorists like ISIL, Al Qaeda, etc.

How do we reconcile the injustice inflicted upon the millions of Christians this century?  We cannot ignore the injustice.  We must deal with it in the right way, otherwise, we could end-up with another catastrophic world war, or chemical/nuclear self-annihilation via Mutual Assured Destruction.  Decades ago, it was the Cold War. Today, it’s radical Jihadist Islam bent on creating a worldwide caliphate vs the non-Islamic world that will never relent to an Islamic caliphate.  Is human rights and justice the true answer?

A rights-oriented society likes to talk about justice in terms of human rights. However, did St. Paul the apostle ever once talk about human rights? I do not recall this ever mentioned in his epistles. Rights was not in his religious vocabulary. Rights, as we know it today, is actually a recent human invention since the Enlightenment Period. It has been engraved with human words in the constitutional frameworks of American and French political lawmakers (e.g., U.S. Bill of Rights and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizens).

The downside and weakness of trying to fight for justice using a framework of human rights is that it can be abused. Human beings have the potential to argue for unlimited types and levels of rights and still consequentially end-up with the likes of Stalin, Pol Pot, Darth Vadar, and The Punisher.

Example: 1) animal rights rather than the utilitarian good of humankind; 2) economic rights for human subsistence, which leads to Marxism/Communism with its horrific ideological means to an end-type of destruction; 3) rights of women for control over their bodies to decide whether to abort unborn babies; 4) rights of persons to choose to suicide; and the list can go on.

What does the bible say about these issues?  Just for starters, Genesis speaks of created world where we care for God’s creation within God’s dominion rather than environmental justice. Jesus and the New Testament speak of sharing and giving to the poor and less-privileged rather than Marxism/Communism. The bible throughout speaks of the sanctity of human life rather than taking away life.

The Gospel of Christ shows the church and the world that God desires to redeem what we have destroyed and twisted. Humanity has a way of manipulating love to seek out one’s selfish interests in the name of caring for one another. However, the Gospel, whether in the Old or New Testaments, show us God’s redemption of a sin-filled world.

Hope is not lost. God still has the ability and power to turn our evil into good but in order for this to happen, we need to confess our sins and seek reconciliation.  We fear confession because there are repercussions to revealing our human wrongs, which may cause even more repercussions (e.g., in Canada, we have harmed the First Nations peoples. In the U.S., we have abused African-Americans through slavery. In our established churches, we have sexually-abused children).  We want to avoid opening up a can of worms for fear of being levied even greater penalties for our past sins.  Denominations, businesses, and nations can go bankrupt from paying endless penalties due to retributive and distributive justice in the courts’ justice system. We need to get past this fear because in God’s love, we have no fear.

There is still good news for all people; however, it’s too bad the world is not able to see this. It is seen with spiritual eyes because God’s redemption comes in a form of weakness. It is far from glorious according to the world’s standards. It is hidden in the form of our suffering and our weakness, but behind it, is God’s power to restore the nations.

The Apostle Paul exemplified this in his above statement to the Roman Christians here in 1 Corinthians 4. Paul’s way of the cross is not worldly but it is deeply spiritual.  Paul’s theology and spirituality is not the most popular because it is contrarian.  Our human temptation is to trust in our own power and strength to destroy or over-power our opposition or weaker party.

Paul’s theology and spirituality is to trust in God’s power to redeem and restore what was lost due to our human evil and sin. It takes faith and trust, and also patience to wait-out and see the results. This is why I stated that this can only be seen with spiritual eyes; in other words, it happens in God’s timing using God’s means and methods–rather than our human timing, means and methods.

May our world come to a deeper spiritual understanding of how God works in this world. May we be truly enlightened by God’s Holy Spirit and words to follow a path shown by God’s love in his one and only Son, Jesus Christ. It is a path towards God’s righteousness and true justice.

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New domain name for this blog?

I have been thinking about getting a new domain name for this blog. Years ago, I lost a previous domain name for NewEpistles but didn’t have time to blog anyway.  Now, I’ve been thinking it still might be good to have a dedicated one that is free from WordPress’ secondary free domain.  I’m debating whether to switch.  I really don’t blog much but I’ve have had more time to blog more than usual while I’ve been vacationing here in Taiwan these several weeks (but returning today).

Is Donald Trump pre-ordained for a time and place today?

History pointed to a leader born to fulfill a purpose.  Winston Churchill was someone who was seen as controversial, openly direct and honest. He went down in history as one of the greatest politicians and statesmen in British history. He surprised many Brits during the Second World War by giving his opinion that Britain must stand up against Hitler and Nazi Germany. This “ruffled many feathers.” imagesThe huge majority of British Parliamentarians did not feel comfortable bucking the trend and remained silent by not stirring the pot. However, Churchill was one man who refused to remain quiet. He openly and directly confronted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, Parliament and urged other nations in the western world to stand up and confront the dangers of Nazism and Adolf Hitler. If Britain did not, these dangers would come back to haunt the nation. Churchill was right.  Hitler would eventually bomb London, England.  Churchill would eventually be elected the Prime Minister to take Britain into the Second World War and defeat Hitler. It was a hard path but he was the man who rose to power at the right time and place to change the history of Europe forever.

Like Churchill, there is the possibility that President-elect Donald Trump might be a leader fit for a special purpose to lead the U.S. in this time of need. The economy seems headed into a collision course; and radical Islam, ISIS and jihadism has as their goal the establishment of a caliphate.  trump3Do you think Trump might be pre-ordained for a time and place today to be a leader of the United States of America for a special reason and season? I do think he has the great potential to be a voice of realism and tilt a balance of power in a direction the nation needs to take.

Recreation and rest

kevinsam_heartlakeRecently I’ve had more time for some recreation.  I love mountain biking, and biking up to a quiet place to be alone and enjoy God’s nature.  This is recreation–something that God made for us.  Some Christians might guilty about having too much fun but when we look at “recreation” from a biblical point-of-view, it simply means “rest”.  Yes, recreation means renewal or rest.  We also need to take time for our bodies, soul, and spirit to just rest and play, as opposed to, only work.  God gave us the Sabbath for rest (Genesis 2:2.) Rest is also connected to our spiritual renewal (Hebrews 4:1-11).  God knows that human beings need rest–so no more need to feel guilty about recreation but let’s remember that God also wants to be a part of our recreation.  We can follow God’s gift of rest by enjoying our lives in what God has given to us.

Some great posts on other blogs

Hey people, here’s a good thought on human righteousness which prompted me to think more on whether it should always be devolved to “filthy rags” as Paul put it. It’s well-balanced. Have a read on Gospel Relevance (David Qaoud) “Why Your Deeds Are Not Like Filthy Rags.”

Why Your Deeds Are Not Like Filthy Rags.

Another thought-provoking blog I’ve also come across is by J.S. Park. I like his approach on how he handles the issue of people with same-sex attraction in the church.

Is there such a thing as a gay Christian?.

Will be back to the blogging scene

It’s been a very long time since I’ve been blogging and posting on the New Epistles blog.  Just caught up in all the work of ministry, but I will be back.

Anyway, here’s something I found something to share with you on the blogosphere. Asbo Jesus hasn’t been doing new stuff lately but I like his art and sense of humor.

thebuilding

Henri Nouwen on Christian leadership

NewEpistles

nouwen jesusHow much to we Christians actually pray about a certain issue before we commit to a conclusion within the church? Arguments, including bickering and complaining rears it head. When this involves moral issues, our emotions can get driven very high. When negative and disgraceful reactions to another’s actions are witnessed, and our behavior doesn’t resemble an authentic witness of Christ’s church, we run and hide our head in shame.

The book: In the Name of Jesus: Reflections on Christian Leadership by Henri Nouwen is an absolutely wonderful short book. It’s packed with powerful nuggets truths and confounds conventional worldly wisdom.  Nouwen encourages that Christians form a discipline of contemplative prayer, saying:

“Christian leaders have to learn to listen again and again to the voice of love and to find there the wisdom and courage to address whatever issue presents itself to them. Dealing with burning issues without being rooted in…

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Happy belated Easter!

Christ is risen! Christ is risen indeed, Hallelujah!

Easter has just come and gone. Thank God that Easter is not as commercialized as Christmas.  It’s no wonder I try to avoid the malls at Christmastime. Easter is still the last remaining Christian holiday that has not been overtaken by crass commercialism. Perhaps business marketing strategies have not yet thought up some ingenius ways to make a ton of money out of Easter? (btw, I have nothing against business. God bless our businesses).

Life: Now that Easter has just passed, I wish things in my life could just slow down a little;however, it doesn’t seem to be slowing down much. I haven’t done much serious blogging in a long time but I hate making excuses. If it’s not work, then it’s my class work in seminary that’s taking up much of my time away from blogging and keeping up with what’s going on in the biblical/theological world in the blogosphere.