Our desire for significance

PrintTruly great people carry themselves with genuine humility through and through, and do not try to prove themselves to anyone.  We admire such people.  It is a godly trait and one that prideful people envy in humble people.  Pride is a temptation common to all human beings and is one of our bigger weaknesses. It’s traditionally known as one of the seven deadly sins.

St. Augustine said, “It was pride that changed angels into devils; it is humility that makes men as angels.”  Finding true humility in people is hard to come by and is an impossibility for most of us.  Even within the church, we all have a desire for recognition (including all human beings).  We want to be associated with people or things greater than ourselves.  I admit, even clergy/pastors do it, e.g., we like to claim we baptized x number of people on baptism Sunday.

In 1 Corinthians 1:14-17, Paul had lambasted some of the Christians for bragging they were baptized by Paul himself (as if his act of baptizing made them more special).

I thank God that I baptized none of you except Crispus and Gaius, so that no one may say that you were baptized in my name. (I did baptize also the household of Stephanas. Beyond that, I do not know whether I baptized anyone else.) For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with words of eloquent wisdom, lest the cross of Christ be emptied of its power. (1 Corinthians 1:14-17)

We try to associate ourselves with something greater than ourselves in order to alter how people perceive us.  Why do we do this?  As most human beings, at times, we feel insecure about ourselves or status.  We have an insatiable desire to be seen as more significant because we feel insignificant in comparison to others.  It comes from our sin of wanting to be God in God’s place.

Paul said he would rather have not baptized anyone except Crispus and Gaius–probably because they were the humble ones who did not brag about having been personally baptized by Paul. It sounds like Paul did not baptized many people, maybe for this very reason. He didn’t care to baptize more people.

Ideally, we ought to be satisfied with associating ourselves with God in Jesus Christ.  We can ask the Holy Spirit to help us forsake this deadly sin of pride.  He will help us.

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Author: Kevin S.

A follower of Jesus, a husband and a father. Hobbies include biking, keeping fish if they don't die on me, blogging when I can, theologizing and ministry, and pondering about world affairs.

2 thoughts on “Our desire for significance”

  1. Not much one can comment on this except to agree. You may enjoy this version of your verses. I like how Paul says [in the Message] ‘I’m sure glad I wasn’t’. and ‘God didn’t send me to collect a following for myself’

    1 Corinthians 1:14-17 The Message (MSG)

    13-16 I ask you, “Has the Messiah been chopped up in little pieces so we can each have a relic all our own? Was Paul crucified for you? Was a single one of you baptized in Paul’s name?” I was not involved with any of your baptisms—except for Crispus and Gaius—and on getting this report, I’m sure glad I wasn’t. At least no one can go around saying he was baptized in my name. (Come to think of it, I also baptized Stephanas’s family, but as far as I can recall, that’s it.)

    17 God didn’t send me out to collect a following for myself, but to preach the Message of what he has done, collecting a following for him. And he didn’t send me to do it with a lot of fancy rhetoric of my own, lest the powerful action at the center—Christ on the Cross—be trivialized into mere words.

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