Dynamic equivalent bible translations

I will be comparing several bible translations.  This hasn’t been done on New Epistles blog in a long time. It’s fun and I miss doing this.  In the past, I used to do this extensively on New Epistles.  This time, we’ll probably be comparing two of my favorite dynamic translations-—the Common English Bible and New Living Translation.

I was reading from the Common English Bible recently.  I like it so much because it’s so clear and easy to read.  It was consistently on the top ten in 2014 but recently since 2015, it seems to have fallen off the top ten (and top 15) in bible unit sales. Not sure what’s going on but personally I think it’s a great functional equivalent translation (dynamic) and deserves more readership.  Most bible readers don’t know the difference and rely on word-of-mouth, but even opinions through word-of-mouth are not the most accurate.  Other dynamic translations have also fallen off the map include New Century Version, God’s Word, and the Voice.  They’re even hardly seen on the bookshelves in Christian bookstores these days.  In April 2015, only the New Living Translation, the Message, NIrV, and Amplified have remained in the top ten on CBA’s ratings.

April 2015 (unit sales, CBA)

1  New International Ver.
2  New Living Translation
3  King James Version
4  New King James Version
5  English Standard Version
6  Reina Valera 1960
7  New American Standard
8  NIrV
9  The Message
10 Holman Christian Standard
11 New American Bible
12 Amplified Bible
13 New Revised Standard Bible
14 Nuevo International

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Author: Kevin S.

A follower of Jesus, a husband and a father. Hobbies include biking, keeping fish if they don't die on me, blogging when I can, theologizing and ministry, and pondering about world affairs.

2 thoughts on “Dynamic equivalent bible translations”

  1. I think it’s partly because the NLT has recently been heavily promoted and continually on sale. Since its purpose and function is similar to that of CEV, sale of CEV suffered as a result.

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  2. Yes, Tyndale knows marketing and does it very well. It’s too bad that lack of good marketing can determine the destiny of even great translations. I just hope it doesn’t drop off too much.

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