The Pope’s call is a return to Christian roots – not a fusion of church and state

The Pontiff is currently in France and he has made a statement concerning church and society, stating: “The roots of France—like those of Europe—are Christian….History itself offers sufficient proof of this: From its origins, your country received the Gospel message.” Good for the Pontiff because this is a gutsy statement. It’s something that secularists do not like to hear. The history of a strong western society stems from its Christian faith. Minus the so-called war against the Turks and Arabs back in the days of the holy crusades and any so-called “war on terror” in the name of religion…western society is based on the Christian religion…or if you want to call it a society based on the spiritual beliefs in Jesus Christ. But today’s secularists seem to ignore this fact.

Today, our society is structured totally different from the days when church and state were fused together. Our democratic governments in the western hemisphere, and non-western governments that have adopted democratic principles, are not anywhere close to being fused together with an official state church (i.e. South Korea, Japan, etc.). But the funny thing is that many knee-jerk secular humanists are so uneducated about what is truly a violation of church and state. When Christian conservatives speak up on issues like abortion or Christian education in the public school systems, the secular humanists will cry foul play.

Well, here’s some news. We are not anywhere close to violating our principles of separation between church and state. Yes, we Christians speak up on matters concerning spiritual matters within the public sphere but there is no official state church involvement in the public sector. There is a big difference between a mother who speaks up on her desire for her child to receive Christian education in public schools, and the bishop or president of a church denomination who makes an agreement with the public education system to promote his/her denomination’s agenda. But even then, would there be anything wrong with this?

For example, if we know our history, the public education system was founded by church-run schools that voluntarily agreed to form a public school system. They promised that all the original churches can get involved to teach Christian education within the public school system. The last jurisdiction in North America to do so was the Province of Newfoundland, Canada, just recently in 1997. Formerly, there were church-run schools run by the Anglicans, Presbyterians, United, Baptists, Pentecostals, Roman Catholics, etc. (news archive: CT, McLean’s, CBC radio). We have gone very far away from our society’s Christian roots and do not even recognize the agreements we have made to our church’s founders who implemented the centralized public education system in order to help lower the cost of our education. Now we have lost our right to teach religious education because the secular humanists have overstepped their boundaries and are trying to push Christianity off to the side because they do not know our history. Today, people are going back against their promise and making a case for not allowing the teaching of religion in public schools. Sad. We must re-educate ourselves about our own history. So like Pope Benedict said to the people of France this week, we also, must return to our Christian roots.

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Author: Kevin S.

A follower of Jesus, a husband and a father. Hobbies include biking, keeping fish if they don't die on me, blogging when I can, theologizing and ministry, and pondering about world affairs.

4 thoughts on “The Pope’s call is a return to Christian roots – not a fusion of church and state”

  1. Great post!

    Here is a link to the book "Christianity and the Crisis of Cultures" which is a collection of B16's talks on this subject before his election to the Papacy. It is quite good and short: http://www.amazon.com/Christianity-Crisis-Cultures-Pope-Benedict/dp/1586171429/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1221582022&sr=8-12

    Also "Without Roots: The West, Relativism, Christianity, Islam" touches on similar themes: http://www.amazon.com/Without-Roots-Relativism-Christianity-Islam/dp/B000MKYKIQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1221582156&sr=1-2

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  2. Hi Tim, welcome to this blog. Thanks to bring to my attention these books you recommended.

    I think Pope Benedict 16 will strengthen the faith of Catholics in ways that previous pope’s could not. I’m no expert on Catholism, but from my perspective, he is one of the best spokespersons the west has seen in a long time because he speaks out prophetically against relativism and the excesses of political correctness. Something that we protestants can learn from.

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  3. Kevin,

    Yes, I agree with your thoughts on Pope Benedict helping to strenghten the faith of Catholics. I think this process began in 1978 with the election of JPII. I know that one of the main reasons I got into ministry work was the witness of JPII. I think Pope Benedict is the same, but in a different way. While JPII was more of a charismatic figure, B16 is more of a fatherly figure. I also enjoy reading B16’s theological and biblical works more so than JPII, who was more of a philosopher.

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  4. “I think Pope Benedict 16 will strengthen the faith of Catholics in ways that previous pope’s could not. I’m no expert on Catholism, but from my perspective, he is one of the best spokespersons the west has seen in a long time because he speaks out prophetically against relativism and the excesses of political correctness. Something that we protestants can learn from.”

    Amen to that Kevin.

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